China faces important decisions

The rise of China has created the conditions for President Xi Jinping to make some important decisions. The main decision is whether to attack the democratic, pro-Western, and 24 million-strong island of Taiwan and bring it under the control of the Chinese Communist Party. Reuters.

If one day, in an armed red-flag limousine, Xi Jinping rides the streets of Taipei, the capital of the island, in the guise of a victor, he will become an immortal socialist. If so, he will join the Chinese Civil War as a co-winner with Mao Zedong. That war ended in 1949, and the Chinese nationalist regime fled to exile in Taiwan.

The road that Xi Jinping will take in Taipei will probably be engulfed in flames, bloodshed, and the Taiwanese who are suffering from authoritarian military rule will clear the road. However, if Taiwan wins, China's power will reach such a level that no country will ever dare to go against China's will. China's strict rulers think that history is not written by picky people.

If Jinping orders the Chinese army to occupy Taiwan, then he will think of only one thing, and that is whether America can stop him.

Self-governing Taiwan has existed for 61 years over whether China's aggression will be resisted by the United States. But Taiwan has also benefited from China's patience, as China has other plans to avoid war.

Since the time of former Chinese supreme leader Deng Xiaoping, the country's leaders have sought to reunite Taiwan economically with mainland China. China has also offered autonomy to the people of Taiwan, where they will be subject to a "one country, two systems" under Beijing. Last year, however, Hong Kong's civil rights abuses shattered Taiwan's notion of a "one country, two systems."

But China is losing patience with "peaceful integration," and more cool accounts have always played a big role. The main reason is that China has kept its hands off for fear that Taiwan's military will be able to hold off until US rescuers arrive.

The US position on the situation is well known to President Joe Biden and his foreign policy partners, and they are already experienced in it. That's why, on the fourth day of the Biden administration's inauguration, the State Department criticized China's military, economic and diplomatic actions in Taiwan, and declared the United States' commitment to Taiwan "as strong as stone."

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